East Texas History

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They Called It the War Effort: Oral Histories from World War II Orange, Texas

Original Price
25.99
ISBN
9780876112502
Binding
Hardcover
By
Louis Fairchild

Over the course of World War II, Orange, Texas’s easternmost city, went from a sleepy southern town of 7,500 inhabitants to a bustling industrial city of 60,000. The bayou community on the Sabine became one of the nation’s preeminent shipbuilding centers. In They Called It the War Effort, Louis Fairchild details the explosive transformation of his native city in the words of the people who lived through it. Some residents who lived in the town before the war speak of nostalgia for the time when Orange was a small, close-knit community and regret for the loss of social cohesiveness of former days, while others speak of the exciting new opportunities and interesting new people that came. Interviewees tell how newcomers from rural areas in Louisiana and East Texas tried to adjust to a new life in close living quarters and to new amenities–like indoor toilets. People from all walks of life talk of the economic shift from the cash and job shortages of Depression era to a war era when these things were in abundance, but they also tell of how wartime rationing made items like Coca-Cola treasured luxuries. Fairchild deftly draws on a wide array of secondary sources in psychology and history to tie together and broaden the perspectives offered by World War II Orangeites. The second edition of this justly praised book features more interviews with non-white residents of Orange, as Japanese Americans and especially African Americans speak not only of the challenges of wartime economic dislocations, but also of living in a southern town where Jim Crow still reigned.

Publication of this book was supported by a generous grant from the Nelda C. and H. J. Lutcher Stark Foundation
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Giant Under the Hill: A History of the Spindletop Oil Discovery at Beaumont, Texas, in 1901

Original Price
14.99
ISBN
9780876112366
Binding
Paperback
By
Ellen Walker Rienstra, Jo Stiles, Judith Walker Linsley
How did a profligate who killed a deputy sheriff before reforming, a mining engineer who went AWOL from the Austrian navy, and three East Texas drillers join forces with other equally colorful characters to drill on Spindletop Hill? The answers are all here—the challenge and frustration of the search, the excitement of the discovery, the euphoric chaos of the boom, and the genesis of the giant companies.

In this scholarly work firmly rooted in the narrative tradition, and using material collected over decades, the authors bring to life the efforts of Pattillo Higgins, Anthony Lucas, Al and Curt Hamill, and Peck Byrd to master the Spindletop salt dome—efforts that culminated in the discovery of the great Lucas Gusher. Their find subsequently transformed not only the state of Texas but the entire oil industry.

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The McFaddin-Ward House

Original Price
6.99
ISBN
9780876111178
Binding
Paperback
By
Jessica Foy, Judith Walker Linsley
The McFaddin-Ward House, home to the prominent McFaddin family, was built in 1906 in the prestigious neighborhood around Calder Avenue. This entertaining volume tells the story of this house and the people who lived in it, bringing out the personalities of the principal inhabitants—W. P. H. McFaddin, his second wife Ida, their daughter Mamie, and Mamie's husband Carroll Ward.
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The Cartwrights of San Augustine: Three Generations of Agricultural Entrepreneurs in Nineteenth-Century Texas

Original Price
39.95
ISBN
978-0876111291
Binding
Hardcover
By
Margaret Swett Henson and Deoloce Parmalee
The Cartwright family created a truly Texas-sized empire over the course of the nineteenth century. The highly readable history of this remarkable entrepreneurial family provides a unique and important view of the Texas experience.
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A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850-1880

Original Price
25
ISBN
9781625110404
Binding
Paperback
By
Randolph B. Campbell, Andrew J. Torget
“Few academic volumes remain timely and relevant more than thirty years after they were first published. This is one of those exceptional books.”—from the foreword by Andrew J. TorgetHistorians have published countless studies of the American Civil War and the era of Reconstruction that followed those four years of brutally destructive conflict. Most of these works focus on events and developments at the national or state level, but much less attention has been given to studying how ordinary people experienced the years from 1861 to 1876. What did secession, civil war, emancipation, victory for the United States, and Reconstruction mean at the local level in Texas? Exactly how much change did the era bring to the focus of the study, Harrison County: a cotton-growing, planter-dominated community with the largest slave population of any county in the state? Providing an answer to that question is the basic purpose of A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850–1880. First published by the Texas State Historical Association in 1983, the book is now available in paperback, with a foreword by Andrew J. Torget, one of the Lone Star State’s top young historians.Randolph B. Campbell is Regents' Professor of History at the University of North Texas. One of the leading historians of Texas of his generation, he has served as Chief Historian of the Texas State Historical Association and is the author of numerous articles and books, including An Empire for Slavery: The Peculiar Institution in Texas, 1821–1865 and Gone to Texas: A History of the Lone Star State.Andrew J. Torget is associate professor of history at the University of North Texas and the author of Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800–1850."
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