Houston Area History

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The Methodist Hospital of Houston: Serving the World

Original Price
15.99
ISBN
9780876110881
Binding
Hardcover
By
Marilyn McAdams Sibley

This fascinating book traces Methodist's transformation from a community institution into an internationally renowned hospital equipped for heart-lung transplants. Opened in 1924, its history reflects the most revolutionary era in medicine. Methodist grew to meet the challenge and to stay on the cutting edge of a new era in medicine that included atomic medicine, high technology, and organ transplants.

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A History of Ashton Villa

Original Price
6.99
ISBN
9780876111123
Binding
Paperback
By
Kenneth Hafertepe

This volume tells the story of the stately Italianate Galveston mansion known as Ashton Villa. Built in 1859, Ashton Villa stood out in antebellum Galveston for its extensive use of new materials: brick and cast iron. It has weathered many a storm, including the Great Hurricane of 1900, when floodwaters invaded its first floor. Now as a historic house museum, Ashton Villa speaks eloquently about the lives and aspirations of an upper-class Texas family in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

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Old Red: Pioneering Medical Education in Texas

Original Price
10.99
ISBN
9780876112540
Binding
Paperback
By
Heather Green Wooten

Tucked away in a corner of the University of Texas Medical Branch campus stands a majestic relic of an era long past. Constructed of red pressed brick, sandstone, and ruddy Texas granite, the Ashbel Smith Building, fondly known as Old Red, represents a fascinating page in Galveston and Texas history. It has been more than a century since Old Red welcomed the first group of visionary faculty and students inside its halls. For decades, the medical school building existed at the heart of UTMB campus life, even through periods of dramatic growth and change. In time, however, the building lost much of its original function to larger, more contemporary facilities. Today, as the oldest medical school building west of the Mississippi River, the intricately ornate Old Red sits in sharp contrast to its sleeker neighbors. 

Old Red: Pioneering Medical Education in Texas examines the life and legacy of the Ashbel Smith Building from its beginnings through modern-day efforts to preserve it. Chapters explore the nascence of medical education in Texas; the supreme talent and genius of Old Red architect, Nicholas J. Clayton; and the lives of faculty and students as they labored and learned in the midst of budget crises, classroom and fraternity antics, death-rendering storms, and threats of closure. The education of the state’s first professional female and minority physicians and the nationally acclaimed work of physician-scientists and researchers are also highlighted. Most of all, the reader is invited to step inside Old Red and mingle with ghosts of the past—to ascend the magnificent cedar staircase, wander the long, paneled hallways, and take a seat in the tiered amphitheater as pigeons fly in and out of windows overhead.

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Galveston: A History and a Guide

Original Price
6.99
ISBN
9780876111789
Binding
Paperback
By
David McComb
Indians! Pirates! Rebels! Blockade Runners! Smugglers! Murder! Beaches! Beauty Contests! Hurricanes!

These are all a part of the colorful history of an island city that once called itself “The Free State of Galveston.” Located at a natural harbor on the northeastern part of a thirty-mile-long sand barrier island, the city dates its beginning from the end of the Texas Revolution. Before then, the harbor had attracted Jean Lafitte, a pirate from Louisiana, and the revolutionary Texan government fleeing in front of the attack of Santa Anna’s Mexican Army.

After independence in 1836, Michel B. Menard, along with nine associates, bought the harbor property and founded the town. Galveston grew on the strength of the harbor—the best between New Orleans and Veracruz—and the city became a major entry point for immigrants to Texas. During the Civil War it was a haven for Confederate blockade runners and the site of one of the major battles of the war in Texas. Afterward it was a center for occupation forces and the point from which Major-General Gordon Granger announced emancipation for Texas slaves on June 19, 1865 (Juneteenth Day). The city later became a major cotton port for the Southwest and the location of the University of Texas Medical School.

In 1900 Galveston was struck by a hurricane and flood that killed approximately six thousand people: the greatest disaster in the history of the United States. Afterward, the citizens built a sea wall, raised the grade of the island, and constructed a causeway for future protection. The city led the way with a commission form of government, and in the first half of the twentieth century, became noted for its illegal drinking, gambling, and prostitution.

After the Texas Rangers cleaned it up, Galveston developed into a tourist town with its attractions of the beach, hotels, celebrations, and fishing. Historic preservation projects such as houses, buildings, museums, and the square-rigged ship Elissa completed its evolution.

This authoritative and well-written history of Galveston provides an overview of the city’s rich and colorful past and provides readers, researchers, and tourists with information about today’s historical points of interest. Galveston: A History and a Guide is a delightful read and a useful traveling companion.
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Ima Hogg: The Governor's Daughter

Original Price
10.99
ISBN
9780876112458
Binding
Paperback
By
Virginia Bernhard

Texas legend has it that James Stephen Hogg, Governor of Texas from 1890 to 1894, named his daughters Ima and Ura, but that is only half-true: there never was a Ura. Ima had three brothers, Will, Mike, and Tom. Ima Hogg, who was born in 1882 and died in 1975 at age 93, became a legend in her own right, and this book is her story. It is also the story of the extraordinary bond between a father and a daughter.
James Stephen Hogg, who worked his way from a hardscrabble life in the piney woods of East Texas to the Governor's Mansion in Austin, was a giant in Texas politics, both literally (standing six feet three inches tall and weighing close to 300 pounds) and figuratively, as the champion of the "little people" against big business in the 1890s. He adored his daughter, and after his wife, Sallie Stinson Hogg, died of tuberculosis in 1895, Ima and her father drew even closer. Jim Hogg, a widower in his 40's with four children--Will, 20; Ima, 13, Mike, 10, and Tom, 8--left politics to practice law in Austin, and Ima became the "sunshine" of her father's household.
While Ima attended the University of Texas and then studied music in New York City, ex-Governor Hogg pursued business interests, and was one of the early investors in the Texas oil boom after the Spindletop gusher in 1901. He was not a rich man when he died in 1906, but the old plantation he bought in Brazos County near West Columbia would eventually produce oil that would make Ima and her brothers wealthy.
The Hogg children lived well, but they also devoted part of their time and money to the enrichment of the educational and cultural life of Texas. Will gave generously to the University of Texas, his alma mater, and to many other institutions, such as the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Houston YMCA. “Miss Ima,” as she was known (she never married), founded the Houston Symphony, served on the Houston School Board, established the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, and restored several historic Texas buildings, including the house at the Varner-Hogg Historic Site, which had been her father's beloved country home. In 1966 she gave her own house, filled with the priceless Early American art and furniture she had collected, as the Bayou Bend Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Thousands of people visit Bayou Bend every year, and this book describes its history, as well as that of an extraordinary Texas woman.
 

Ima Hogg: The Goverrnor's Daughter is number 20 in the Fred Rider Cotten Popular History Series.

 

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The Samuel May Williams Home: The Life and Neighborhood of an Early Galveston Entrepreneur

Original Price
6.99
ISBN
9780876111253
Binding
Paperback
By
Deoloce Parmalee, Margaret Swett Henson

Built in the winter of 1839-1840, this house, and the Texas pioneer who inhabited it, are the central focus of this thoroughly researched and well-written study of Galveston's merchant elite—Gail Borden, Michel Menard, Thomas McKinney, and others—a generation of leaders who did much to shape their city and Texas itself.

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For more than five years award-winning photographer Geoff Winningham explored and photographed Buffalo Bayou, the Houston Ship Channel, and the landscape he found along the way. As he hiked and canoed the course of this historic stream, he found pristine stretches of the bayou still untouched by the encroaching city of Houston. He also found areas where the forces of nature and those of the growing city seemed to struggle for supremacy. He revisited sites of historic importance, such as Allen’s Landing, where the city was founded in 1836, and the San Jacinto Battlefield, where Texas won its independence in the same year.

In Along Forgotten River, Winningham has sequenced eighty of his striking, large-format black-and-white photographs, following Buffalo Bayou from its source in the Katy Prairie through the suburbs and into the inner city of Houston. From there, his stunning duotone photographs follow the bayou east to its confluence with the San Jacinto River, where it becomes the Houston Ship Channel, crosses Galveston Bay, and enters the Gulf of Mexico.

As a counterpoint to his photographs, Winningham has edited and sequenced passages from the written accounts of the earliest travelers to this part of Texas. Impelled by dreams or curiosity, an incredibly diverse lot of travelers came along the roads and streams of Texas in the preceding centuries. There were Spanish friars and itinerant preachers, prospective settlers, refugees, adventurers, exiles, and naturalists.

Some travelers came with their families, looking for a place to settle. Mrs. Dilue Harris was one of these who came to Texas in the early 1830s. In her "Reminiscences," she recalled a night on Buffalo Bayou: "We were surrounded by wolves and water. There was a large sycamore tree that stood in the water near us, and it was as white as snow. The buzzards roosted in it. We could hear owls hoot all night. Mother said it was a night of horrors. . . . She said the owls were singing a funeral dirge, and the wolves and buzzards were waiting to bury us. . . ."

In Along Forgotten River, Winningham has selected passages from the writings of these and other early travelers and interwoven them with his remarkable and beautiful photographs. The result is a complex and fascinating interplay of pictures and words, of historical perspective and present-day observation.

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Biracial Unions on Galveston's Waterfront, 1865-1925

Original Price
29.9
ISBN
9780876112175
Binding
Hardcover
By
Clifford Farrington
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a tradition of biracial unionism sprang up among waterfront workers along the Gulf Coast. Galveston’s waterfront workers formed some of Texas’ earliest and strongest labor organizations in an era when the city was a leading seaport and the most important commercial center in Texas.

Foremost among these workers were the white cotton screwmen, whose skill and economic importance in the loading of cotton enabled them to control the labor supply as well as wages and working conditions. As the importance of cotton screwing declined in the 1890s, white and black union leaders, if not all rank-and-file members, began to recognize the advantages of biracial unionism at a time when southern states began to enact Jim Crow laws.

This history of a particular laboring community studies black and white workers’ consciousness and how the conflicts between race and class were worked out in practice, adding to our knowledge of race and the labor movement, the course of biracial unionism in the South, and Texas labor history.
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